Make Mine A Double, Opinion

SuperValu Italian Red Duo [Make Mine a Double #44]

In edition #43 of Make Mine a Double I reviewed two whites from the forthcoming SuperValu Italian Wine Sale.  Now I look at a couple of reds from Piedmont and Tuscany which will feature in the same even.  In fact, they are by the same pair of producers as the white wines, so you already know the background to the producers.  Below are therefore just some brief tasting notes

Disclosure: both bottles were kindly provided as samples, opinions remain my own

Ricossa Barbera d’Asti 2016 (13.5%, RRP €12.99 down to €10.00 in the Italian Wine Sale starting 23rd May at SuperValu)

Risocca Barbera D'AstiIt’s a fairly established truism now that winemakers in Piedmont rarely drink Nebbiolo themselves, even if they produce it.  Barbera is the leading candidate to accompany their evening meal, and to be honest it would be mine too.

This is a damned drinkable example from Ricossa.  It shows warm red and black fruit on the nose, especially fresh and stewed plum, plus a sprinkle of chocolate.  This continues through to the palate which shows the same fruits and a touch of chocolate, plus fine tannins and lip-smackingly fresh cherry on the finish.  This is a belter at the normal price, nevermind the special offer!

Castellani Chianti Classico 2016 (12.5%, RRP €15.99 down to €12.00 at SuperValu)

Castellani Chianti Classico

Given the modest alcohol of 12.5% this wine might be considered a lightweight by today’s standards, but it doesn’t feel like it is lacking.  The body is medium or so and it’s an approachable wine where nothing juts out too much; there’s a little bit of tannin, a decent splash of acidity and lots of juicy black fruit – blackberry and black cherry in particular.  There’s a hint of liquorice for the Sangiovese purists but this is more about being a very drinkable wine than being recognisably Chianti Classico.

It doesn’t live up to some of the much more expensive wines which display the Gallo Nero, but if you take it within its price bracket then it will do very nicely.  This would be great with the Friday night pizza or just on its own as a glass to quaff.

 

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Alsace in Numbers

As we approach Alsace Wine Week 2019, a reblog of this post seems appropriate!

Frankly Wines

After a successful first #AlsaceWineWeek in Ireland  I thought I’d pick out a few key numbers to give readers a background to the region.

2 Departments

2

The Alsace region is divided administratively into 2 Départements

  1. Haut Rhin (Upper Rhine)
  2. Bas Rhin (Lower Rhine)

4 Noble Grapes

Channel-4-logo

  1. Riesling
  2. Pinot Gris
  3. Gewurztraminer
  4. Muscat (usually Muscat Blanc à Petits Grains)

As a general rule, Grand Cru wines can only be made from one of these noble grapes.

4% of vineyard area is Grand Cru

4-Percent

This compares to approximately 2% of Burgundy being Grand Cru (with a further 12% being Bourgogne Premier Cru).

7 Featured Grapes

7

In addition to the 4 noble grapes above, there are also

  1. Pinot Blanc
  2. Pinot Noir
  3. Sylvaner

These three plus the four noble grapes above are the most commonly seen on wine labels.

13 Total Grapes

13

Apart from the featured grapes there are six others which can legitimately be used…

View original post 337 more words

Tasting Events

Fruit and Balance [Alsace Vault Vol. 1]

cof
Françoise Gilley (L) & Agathe Bursin (R)

Last year, thanks to the generosity of Françoise and Seán Gilley of Terroirs in Donnybrook, Dublin, I had the opportunity to meet one of the young stars of Alsace wine, Agathe Bursin.  And not only meet her, but to have her guide us through a tasting of her wines and then try the wines with the excellent food of Forest Avenue.

Like many people in Alsace, Agathe Bursin had a connection to winemaking when she grew up, although not directly from her parents like some.  In her small infant school she was the only girl along with four boys; that is, four boys who all wanted to be a tractor driver on their family’s vineyards, so it was only natural for the young Agathe to dream of this as well.

Secondly, while her family had been selling their grapes to the local cooperative since 1956, her grandfather did make some small amount of wine for family consumption – and Agathe was fascinated by the equipment and the process.

Fast forward several years to 2000, and she graduated in Oenology, but when her first wines were made back home in accordance with her textbooks, they didn’t feel like her wines at all.  She learnt from this minor setback and took an entirely new approach; stripped back and providing a gentle hand of direction only when required.

Since then she has followed organic and biodynamic practices (though has not sought certification) including the use of herbal teas in the vineyard and only indigenous yeast for fermentation.  Interestingly, it is the yeast present in the cellar rather than the vineyard that usually win the biochemical war that is fermentation.  She neither encourages nor discourages malolactic fermentation, it is simply permitted to happen if it happens.  Thankfully though, it usually happens spontaneously in the red wines and not in the whites.

Agathe’s Domaine now totals around 5.5 hectares, split over the Grand Cru Zinnkoepflé and the Lieux-dits Bollenberg, Dirstelberg, Strangenberg, all around her home village of Westhalten.  The split of varieties is: 5% Muscat, 15% Pinot Gris, 20% Riesling, 20% Gewurztraminer and 20% Sylvaner.  Some of the vines are co-planted – more on which later.

Here are my tasting notes on the wines, with the rider that je ne crache pas les blancs….

mdePinot Noir Strangenberg 2015 is from grapes grown on marl and limestone soil.  The grapes are hand picked then partially de-stemmed (40% – 60% depending on the vintage).  There is no cold soak; fermentation begins in stainless steel tanks with eight days of maceration (longer would lead to the wine being too vegetal) before being transferred into used 228 litre pièces to complete the two months of fermentation.  Maturation is for 20 months.  This Pinot Noir shows bright red and black cherry fruit; it’s a smooth wine that has taken a touch of weight and roundness from its time in oak but very little obvious flavour.

Dirstelberg Riesling 2016.jpgRiesling Dirstelberg 2016 is grown on the highest vineyard in Alsace at 500 metres above sea-level.  The soil is red sandstone, sheltered from the wind but still cool (which Riesling prefers).  The vines are trained as Double Guyot which tends to give small berries.  According to Agathe, with age these wines take on chalky, mineral characters rather than diesel.  At this young age it is racy, nervous and tangy, full of fresh citrus – lime lemon and grapefruit – and orange blossom.

mdePinot Blanc Parad’Aux 2016 is a blend of Pinot Blanc and its close relation Auxerrois.  The former has high acidity (which is why it is so popular in Crémant d’Alsace) whereas the latter is quite floral and has moderate acidity.  The two varieties are co-fermented and the local yeast naturally leaves a little bit of residual sugar (6 g/L) which comes across as roundness rather than sweetness (Agathe believes her indigenous yeast are “quite lazy”).  Soft stone fruits are the order of the day here, with a touch of peach, apricot and nectarine.

mdeL’As de B 2016 is a proper field blend, where the different varieties are all planted in the same plot, are harvested and then vinified together.  Bizarrely, while the different varieties would normally ripen at different times in their own blocks, when planted together they mature together!  The blend is – are you ready for this? – 5% Muscat, 15% Pinot Gris, 20% Gewurztraminer, 20% Riesling, 20% Pinot Blanc and 20% Sylvaner.  The residual sugar for the blend falls between 10 and 20 g/L depending on vintage.  The 2016 shows lots of spice, with the Gewurz and Pinot Gris particularly showing through.   Interestingly, although the blend stays the same from year to year, different grapes seem to come to the fore with each vintage.

mdeL’As de B 2008 shows how well this wine can age – it still shows great freshness as well as development, but is not yet fully mature.  It seems soft and gentle, as though it had settled in to itself with age.

As I speak reasonable French I presumed that “As de B” signified “L’As de Bursin”, i.e Bursin’s Ace, but this is not the case.  The grapes all come from the Bollenberg; the story is that when the blend was first vinified, someone chalked “Edelzwicker” on the tank – the traditional Alsace blend – but as Edelzwicker is not usually a field blend, Agathe didn’t want to use that term.  Instead she preferred “Assemblage de Bollenberg”, but as that was far too long she settled for L’As de B – and the name stuck.

Dirstelberg Pinot Gris 2016.jpgPinot Gris Dirstelberg 2016 is grown on the same red sandstone as the Riesling.  RS is off-dry at 14 g/L which is my preferred style for the grape.  The palate has delicious quince and pear plus exotic spices.  It is rich but nowhere near cloying.

Per Agathe, with age the Pinot Gris Dirstelberg gains notes of smoke, toast and flint – this sounds very intriguing and something I hope to experience for myself in the not too distant future!

mdeGewurztraminer Dirstelberg 2016 is the wine which gave Agathe the most worry.  On the Dirstelberg, Gewurz naturally produces lots of leaves, but as winds tend not to be strong there is a significant risk of bunch rot if they are not trimmed back.  Once harvested, the grapes are given a very gentle pressing over 6 to 8 hours in order to extract only moderate phenolics – this also results in the wine looking somewhat paler than the average young Gewurz.  This is a gentle, restrained Gewurztraminer that really does live up to Agathe’s desire for fruit and balance.  If only more could be like this, I think the grape would have more fans.

mdeRiesling Grand Cru Zinnkoeplé Vendanges Tardives 2015 shows how sweet Riesling can be a magnificent, balanced rapier.  Residual sugar of 65 g/L is the counterpoint to thrilling, racy acidity.

It’s still very young and tangy – and very enjoyable – but has years of magnificence ahead of it.  If I had a case or two, then yes I’d be tempted to dive in now and again, but I think, despite the expletives of joy in my tasting notes, this is one that will be legendary in a decade’s time.

mdeGewurztraminer Grand Cru Zinnkoeplé Vendanges Tardives 2015 is getting on for the longest name of any wine I’ve ever reviewed!  Harvesting took place at the beginning of November, so this is a true Vendanges Tardives.

Obviously sweeter on the palate than the Riesling above – both in terms of higher RS at 89 g/L and softer acidity – this is a mighty fine example of late harvest Gewurz.  Compared to some it’s relatively muted – but as the grape can be such an overblown, blousy, tart’s boudoir, this is not necessarily a bad thing.

 


Post Script: Does Agathe drive a tractor now?  You bet she does!

 

Make Mine A Double, Opinion

Italian White Duo from SuperValu [Make Mine a Double #43]

According to the Celtic calendar, summer starts on 1st May – which is earlier than when summer starts in many other European traditions. It does seem this year that the summer here in Ireland started and finished on the same day, which is quite unusual to say the least. Hopefully the sunshine will return and barbecues will be in action again soon. If you fancy a nice white wine to sip when the sun does return, you could do far worse than this pair from SuperValu, currently in their Italian Wine Sale:

Disclosure: both bottles were kindly provided as samples, opinions remain my own

Ricossa Gavi 2016 (12.0%, RRP €13.99 down to €10.00 in the Italian Wine Sale starting 23rd May at SuperValu)

Ricossa Gavi

Ricossa have the words “Antica Casa” below their name on wine labels, which (I believe) translates literally as “Ancient House,” but perhaps would be better represented by “Historic House”. Ricossa are based close to the town of Asti in Piedmont (or Piemonte if you prefer) and make wines from the regions’s well known areas – Barbera d’Asti, Barolo and Barbaresco, plus a Barbera Appassimento which is very much en vogue at the moment (or should that be di moda? My Italian is very poor, I apologise!)

Cortese di Gavi is – funnily enough – the DOCG for wines from 100% Cortese made in eleven communes in and around Gavi. Usually just known as Gavi (or Gavi di Gavi if made in the actual commune of Gavi), the wines were granted DOC status in 1974 and then DOCG in 1998.

This is a nice tangy example, with both ripe peach and dry peach stone, flowers, a touch of citrus, and dry herbs. This would be fantastic with a dish using white fish baked with herbs.

Castellani Collesano Vermentino IGT Toscana 2017 (12.5%, RRP €16.99 down to €10.00 in the Italian Wine Sale starting 23rd May at SuperValu)

Castellani Collesano Vermentino

The Castellani family made the move from grape-growers to wine producers in 1903 and haven’t looked back since. They now have a stable of six estates across Tuscany, with Chianti and Chianti Classico being major strengths.

Away from the reds, Vermentino is one of the few white grapes that flourishes in Tuscany. In a broad swathe from Tuscany round to the Languedoc in France – taking in Sardinia on the way – it is well established but with a variety of local synonyms, including: Pigato (Liguria), Favorita (Piedmont) and Rolle (Provence).

This has a lovely nose of aromatic stone fruit, a pinch of spice and a hint of musk. It’s a pleasant easy drinking wine with nice mouthfeel; there’s juicy stone fruit in the mid-palate and a dry but mouth-watering finish.

**Click here to see more posts in the Make Mine a Double Series**

Tasting Events

Tindal Treats (part 1 – Schlumberger)

In the lead up to #AlsaceWineWeek 2019 (starting 20th May) I will be publishing a series of Alsace-related articles – though, given my tastes, that’s not such a big surprise anyway.

The wines of Domaines Schlumberger will be on the Tindal / Searson’s table at the #BigAlsaceTasting on 22nd May – see here for more details.

Earlier this year I dropped in to the Tindal Wines portfolio tasting and tried the wines from several producers, including the excellent Domaines Schlumberger (from the town of Guebwiller in the south of the Alsace wine region) which were being shown by Séverine Schlumberger.  Her commentary was very insightful and has been paraphrased in the notes below.

Most of the land around Guebwiller had been owned by the Prince Abbots of Murbach Abbey – hence the name of the Princes Abbés wines – but it was taken out of their hands during the French Revolution.  Later, the shrewd Ernest Schlumberger added to the family’s holdings by buying up plots in the early 1800s.

carte_schlumberger

The map on the left gives you an idea how steep the hillsides are around Guebwiller – as steep as 50% incline, and coming right down into the town.  The map also highlights the four Grand Cru vineyards of Guebwiller (the only town or village in Alsace to have four, all of which were among the first batch of 25 recognised in 1983); Schlumberger have land across all four amounting to 70 hectares, half of their total holdings.

 

Domaines Schlumberger Les Princes Abbés Alsace Riesling 2014 (12.5%, 2.8 g/L, RRP €22.95 at Searsons, Monkstown; searsons.com)

Domaines Schlumberger Les Princes Abbés Riesling

With its large number of Grands Crus (51), permitted grape varieties (13) and soil types (13), Alsace is complex – but it doesn’t have to be complicated!  With so much choice some sommeliers and retailers don’t even know where to start, but a clean, dry, fruity Alsace Riesling is an excellent place to start.  If there is a dish which partners well with a crisp, dry white wine – think Sancerre, Chablis, Muscadet etc. – then a Riesling such as this “Les Princes Abbés” would also be well suited – it’s dry (2.8 g/L of residual sugar), clean and has zesty lime fruit.

Domaines Schlumberger Les Princes Abbés Alsace Pinot Gris 2016 (13.5%, 9.6 g/L, RRP €22.95 at Searsons, Monkstown; searsons.com; JJ. Fields and Co, Skibbereen)

Domaines Schlumberger Les Princes Abbés Pinot Gris

Alsace Pinot Gris is the ultimate all-rounder at the table – it can partner well with so many dishes – shellfish, fish, chicken, pork etc. – that, if a group are sharing a bottle but eating different foods then this is the one which works best.  The technical analysis reveals this to be very slightly off-dry, but sweetness is hardly noticeable at all – instead, it adds to the roundness and mouthfeel of the wine.

Domaines Schlumberger Les Princes Abbés Alsace Gewurztraminer 2016 (13.4%, 20.4 g/L, RRP €26.95 at Searsons, Monkstown and searsons.com)

Domaines Schlumberger Les Princes Abbés Gewurztraminer

Gewurztraminer is a speciality of Domaines Schlumberger.  This “Les Princes Abbés” is so good that for most restaurants and merchants there’s little point in listing both this and the Grand Cru Kitterlé – it’s one or the other.  This is a very well balanced example of Gewurz – for me, balance is the biggest let down of many Alsace Gewurz wines.  The nose has floral notes but they are not overdone.  On the palate this is clean with a mineral streak but nice roundness.

Domaines Schlumberger ,Alsace Grand Cru Saering Riesling 2015 (14.0%, 4.3 g/L, RRP €31.95 at The Parting Glass, Enniskerry; Daly’s Drinks, Boyle; Searsons, Monkstown and searsons.com)

Domaines Schlumberger Grand Cru Saering Riesling

Schlumberger make three Grand Cru Rieslings; Kitterlé, Kessler and this Saering.  This is the most flexible of the three so tends to be the one picked when a restaurants wants to list a single Grand Cru Riesling.  The 2015 Saering is powerful with 14.0% alcohol but not hot.  Dry, floral and zesty, it has a lovely citrus sensibility with a strong mineral backbone and a long, elegant finish.

Domaines Schlumberger Alsace Grand Cru Spiegel Pinot Gris 2014 (12.4%, 28.4 g/L, RRP €31.95 at Searsons, Monkstown and searsons.com)

Domaines Schlumberger Grand Cru Spiegel Pinot Gris

In Alsace, Pinot Gris grapes destined for inclusion in Grand Cru wines is picked later than that for normal Pinot Gris wines (this was worded very carefully as some fruit from Grand Cru vineyards is used in the second wines).  This gives the grapes higher ripeness but does have a cost; as a grape it has a very short harvest window (between sufficient ripeness and over-ripeness) so needs to be monitored very carefully.  This is a luscious and generous wine, spicy and rich.  It is style unique to Alsace which makes Pinot Gris narrowly my second favourite variety of this amazing region.

 

Opinion, Single Bottle Review

Plaimont Saint Mont “En La Tradition” Blanc 2016 [Frankie’s Single Bottle Review #23]

Producteurs Plaimont are a co-operative wine producing organisation based in south western France.  They produce AOC wines from Madiran, Pacherenc and Saint-Mont plus IGP Côtes de Gascogne.  I won’t go into lots of detail on them here as they will feature in a future article in my series on Co-operatives.

Saint-Mont is a small commune of around 300 people in the Gers department, located in the new Occitanie region of south-west France.  Côtes de Saint-Mont was created as a VDQS in 1981, lost the “Côtes de” in 2007 and was then promoted to AOC in 2011 when the VDQS level was eliminated.  The permitted zone of production is around 1,200 hectares reaching across 46 communes.

Both reds and whites are produced here.  Permitted grapes are:
  • Red wines: Tannat (minimum 60%),  Fer Servadou (minimum 20%), Cabernet Franc and Cabernet Sauvignon.
  • White wines: Arrufiac, Petit Courbu, Petit Manseng and Gros Manseng

Plaimont Saint Mont “En La Tradition” Blanc 2016 (13.0%, RRP €15.95 – €16.95 at Baggot Street Wines, D4; Honest 2 Goodness, Glasnevin; Ardkeen Stores, Waterford; Daly’s Drinks, Boyle, Co. Roscommon)

Plaimont Saint Mont En La Tradition Blanc

Either consciously or subconsciously, many wine enthusiasts think of an inverse correlation between quantity and quality, i.e. if there’s a lot of it, it’s not going to be that good.  This wine smashes that theory as it is anything but small production, yet tastes absolutely delicious!  It’s very aromatic on the nose, with fleshy peach, apricot, mandarin and grapefruit on the palate.  Generous fruit sweetness on the mid-palate gives way to mineral notes and a long, fresh finish.  With fruit, texture and acidity this would be a very flexible wine for food matching.

Opinion, Single Bottle Review

Castello di Ama “Ama” Chianti Classico 2015 [Frankie’s Single Bottle Review #22]

Great wines have been made around the village of Ama for centuries, but the Castello di Ama winery was only founded in the 1970s by a group of local families who were keen to revive the area’s vinous fortunes.  Over the years they developed a significant range of Chianti wines – including several single vineyard wines that became part of the Gran Selezione classification – plus some IGTs including a Pinot Nero and a Chardonnay.

However, a significant milestone was  in 2010 when parts of each of the four vineyards were planted with new, high quality clones of Sangiovese.  As Sangiovese is prone to mutate quicker than many varieties (as in the case with Pinot Noir), a co-ordinated project within the Chianti Classico region was launched to improve the genetic material in the vineyards.  Of course, this cannot be done in a single go without huge quality and cashflow issues so it is done piecemeal.  Once the new vines were old enough to bear good grapes they were harvested and blended into a new cuvée, simply known as “Ama”.

Vineyard Technical Data (from website):

  • Total vineyard area: 80 hectares (198 acres)
  • Vineyard names: Bellavista, Casuccia, San Lorenzo and Montebuoni
  • Exposure: North-West, South-East
  • Soil: clay and calcareous
  • Altitude: 460-525 metres above sea level.
  • Training system: vertical trellis with single Guyot
  • Vine density: 5,200 vines/ha
  • Clone selections (for “Ama”): Sangiovese: CC2000, CC2004, AGRI45; Merlot: 343; Rootstock: 420

Castello di Ama “Ama” Chianti Classico 2015 (12.5%, RRP €32.95 at Karwig Wines and Mitchell & Son)

Castello di Ama

For me there is a lot of ordinary Chianti around (although this could be said for many well-known regions) and the wines can be quite thin and tannic without any fruit to counterbalance.  Despite 2015 being a warm and excellent year, the indicated alcohol of Ama is only 12.5%, which is a touch lighter than I would have expected both before and after tasting it.

Wine Technical Data (assembled from website):

  • Blend: 96% Sangiovese, 4% Merlot
  • 2015 Harvest dates: 22nd September (Merlot), 5th to 8th October (Sangiovese)
  • Yeasts: Ambient yeasts
  • Fermentation time: 25 days (varieties fermented separately)
  • Malolactic fermentation: Yes, in stainless steel tanks
  • Maturation: After blending, in second-use tight-grained oak casks
  • Bottled: January 2017

This is a smooth, quite powerful and spicy wine which is recognisably Sangiovesi and recognisably Chianti but is quite self-assured.  To have these results from such young vines is a testament to the plan of using new clones, the potential of the site and very accomplished wine-making.  After being disappointed too often this has renewed my love of Chianti!

 

Opinion

In Praise of Co-operatives – Part 2 – Produttori del Barbaresco

Very few co-operatives are talked about in the same revered tones as Produttori del Barbaresco (“Producers of Barbaresco”, known as “Produttori” for short).  They have something of a cult following, and in good vintages their nine single vineyard (or “Cru”) Riserva wines are eagerly anticipated.

In fact, the single vineyard wines are only released when the winery believe that all nine are deserving of an individual release, otherwise the wines are blended into the Barbaresco DOCG (and, I’d imagine, some of the grapes which would go into that wine in a good year are declassified down into Langhe Nebbiolo).  That doesn’t mean that every single grape from those Cru will go into the Riserva wines; there is strict quality control.

The family name of each grower is included on the back label of each single vineyard wine (see below), even if there is an odd year where their grapes are not included for some reason.  As some of the owners’ surnames are the same there might appear to be some who own land in several different Crus!

Key Facts:

  • Founded: 1958
  • Location: Barbaresco, Piedmont, Italy
  • No. of members: 50*
  • Grape varieties: Nebbiolo (100%)
  • Vineyard area: 250 acres / 100 hectares
  • Annual production (typical): 550,000 bottles / 45,000 cases
  • Labelled as (in good vintages):
    • Barbaresco (50%)
    • Single vineyard Barbarescos (30%)
    • Nebbiolo Langhe (20%)

A crucial fact about the whole winemaking process is that grapes from all nine single vineyards are treated the same, so that terroir rather than winemaking is the distinguishing factor.  For the 2013 vintage the following applies to the Crus:

  • Vinification: fermentation at 30°c (85°f), 28 days of skin contact time, malolactic completed
  • Ageing: 36 months in large oak barrels and 12 months in bottles
  • Bottling date: April 2017
  • Longevity: 20 years from the vintage

Below are brief tasting notes from the full range of wines supplemented by some relevant information from the Produttori website and a concise** overall summary of each Cru by Managing Director Aldo Vacca.

Produttori del Barbaresco, Langhe Nebbiolo 2015 (14.5%, RRP €28)

Langhe Nebbiolo

Website info:

  • Soil: limestone and clay, rich in calcium with sandy veins
  • Vinification: fermentation in concrete tanks at 28°C (83°F), 24 days on the skins, pumping over twice a day, malolactic fermentation completed
  • Ageing: in large oak barrels (25, 35 and 50 HL)
  • Bottling date: September 2017
  • Total production: 100,000 bottles (8,500 cases)

The Langhe Nebbiolo is made from lighter grapes across the 100 hectare estate, especially from younger vines or those with a less directly southerly aspect.  Quite floral on the nose, it shows lots of soft red fruit on the palate, particularly fresher red berries such as cranberry and raspberry.  The finish has plenty of tannin to remind you that you’re drinking Nebbiolo, but this is an approachable style and a great starting point for the estate.

Produttori del Barbaresco, Barbaresco 2013 (14.0%, RRP ~€45)

Barbaresco 2013

Website info:

  • Vineyard exposure: south, west, east
  • Soil: limestone and clay, rich in calcium with sandy veins
  • Vinification: in stainless steel tanks, at 30°C (85°F), 28 days on the skins, pumping over 2-3 times a day, malolactic completed
  • Ageing: 24 months approx.
  • Bottling date: April 2016
  • Total production: approx. 220,000 bottles
    (18,500 cases)

This regular (non “Riserva”) Barbaresco is a midway point between the Langhe Nebbiolo and the single vineyard wines.  The texture is super smooth, showing that Barbaresco’s tag as “feminine” rings true.  It has the same fresh red fruit as the junior wine but moving into softer red fruits such as strawberries.  This has a lovely balance to it and a long finish.

Produttori del Barbaresco, Barbaresco Riserva “Pora” 2013 (14.0%, RRP ~€60)

Pora2013

Bottle tasted: 7,525 / 16,666

Website info:

  • Vineyard size: 10.7 hectares (26.4 acres)
  • Vineyard exposure: south, south-west
  • Soil: calcareous limestone with sandy veins
  • Vineyard owners: Dellaferrera, Manzone

Aldo Vacca one word review: Approachable

I concur with the “approachable” description, though it is a little more serious than the standard Barbaresco.  There’s lovely red fruit in there but the finish is a little tannic and drying for my tastes when drunk on its own.  (Pro Tip: drink it with food!)

Produttori del Barbaresco, Barbaresco Riserva “Rio Sordo” 2013 (14.0%, RRP ~€60)

Rio Sordo

Bottle tasted: 12,439 / 13,333

Website info:

  • Vineyard size: 4.5 hectares (11.0 acres)
  • Vineyard exposure: south – west
  • Soil: calcareous limestone with sandy veins
  • Vineyard owners: Alutto, Marengo

Aldo Vacca one word review: Elegant

This is an altogether deeper, richer wine than the Pora.  It shows a range of delicious red to black fruits with a pinch of exotic spice.  Sumptuous and well balanced, this is an outstanding wine.

Produttori del Barbaresco Barbaresco Riserva “Asili” 2013 (14.0%, RRP ~€60)

Asili2013

Bottle tasted: 10,432 / 13,333

Website info:

  • Vineyard size: 2.28 hectares (5.63 acres)
  • Vineyard exposure: south / south – west
  • Soil: calcareous limestone with sandy veins
  • Vineyard owners: Conti, Giacosa, Viglino

Aldo Vacca one word review: Austere

I didn’t find this wine austere, but it was medium rather than full bodied with considerable acidity.  We’re back to red fruit and floral notes here; the Asili is finely balanced and poised – a fine wine in several senses.

Produttori del Barbaresco Barbaresco Riserva “Pajè” 2013 (14.0%, RRP ~€60)

Paje2013

Bottle tasted: 7,698 / 10,000

Website info:

  • Vineyard size: 1.8 hectares (4.5 acres)
  • Vineyard exposure: south – west / west
  • Soil: calcareous limestone with sandy veins
  • Vineyard owners: Basso, Giordano

Aldo Vacca one word review: Bright

Among the red fruit notes which are close to ubiquitous in Produttori’s wine, the Pajè has a whole rack of herbs.  This is a tangy wine which I found to be slightly shorter than the others, but very nice drinking nevertheless.

Produttori del Barbaresco Barbaresco Riserva “Ovello” 2013 (14.0%, RRP ~€60)

Ovello2013

Bottle tasted: 7,572 / 17,160

Website info:

  • Vineyard size: 20.3 hectares (50 acres)
  • Vineyard exposure: south – west / south east
  • Soil: calcareous limestone and clay
  • Vineyard owners: Audasso, Cavallo, Cravanzola, Gonella, Grasso, Maffei, Odore, Sarotto, Unio, Vacca, Varaldo

Aldo Vacca one word review: Lively

The clay in Ovello’s soils has helped to produce a wine which has less pronounced acidity and tannin than most of its counterparts.  Instead there’s fruit – lots of fruit! – and power.  There are tannins at the end but they are fine and not drying.  This is a Nebbiolo that is delicious on its own.

Produttori del Barbaresco Barbaresco Riserva “Muncagota” 2013 (14.0%, RRP ~€60)

Muncagota

Bottle tasted: 12,892 / 13,333

Website info:

  • Vineyard size: 4.5 hectares (11 acres)
  • Vineyard exposure: south – west
  • Soil: calcareous limestone
  • Vineyard owners: Bellora, Casetta, Lignana, Viglino

Aldo Vacca one word review: Floral

Muncagota is floral but it’s also the results of a raid on your spice cupboard.  Bright red and black cherries greet the palate, with a finish of tobacco and liquorice which are reminiscent of a Tuscan Sangiovesi.  This is no shrinking violet and would pair well with game such as venison or wild boar.

Produttori del Barbaresco Barbaresco Riserva “Rabajà” 2013 (14.0%, RRP ~€60)

Rabaja

Bottle tasted: 8,512 / 17,040

Website info:

  • Vineyard size: 3.7 hectares (9.14 acres)
  • Vineyard exposure: south – west
  • Soil: calcareous limestone with sandy veins
  • Vineyard owners: Antona, Arossa, Casetta, Lembo, Lignana, Manzone, Rocca, Vacca, Vezza

Aldo Vacca one word review: Complete

With nine families owning a total of just 3.7 hectares (only the much larger Ovello has more owners), the Rabajà shows exactly why co-operatives can be the best choice of ownership and vinification models.  The 2013 is powerful but on the dry side, with some intriguing menthol notes, herbs and spices overlaid on the red fruit.

Produttori del Barbaresco, Barbaresco Riserva “Montestefano” 2013 (14.0%, RRP ~€60)

Montestefano

Bottle tasted: 8,114 / 17,104

Website info:

  • Vineyard size: 4.5 hectares (11 acres)
  • Vineyard exposure: south
  • Soil: calcareous limestone
  • Vineyard owners: Gonella, Maffei, Marcarino, Rivella, Rocca, Vacca

Aldo Vacca one word review: Powerful

For me the Montestefano is a great all-rounder, with the positive points from all the others rolled into once – lovely fruit and floral notes, decent but not harsh acidity and tannin, balance and poise – the full package.

Produttori del Barbaresco, Barbaresco Riserva “Montefico” 2013 (14.0%, RRP ~€60)

Montefico2013

Bottle tasted: 11,099 / 13,333

Website info:

  • Vineyard size: 3.9 hectares (9.6 acres)
  • Vineyard exposure: south
  • Soil: calcareous limestone
  • Vineyard owners: Grasso, Rocca, Vacca

Aldo Vacca one word review: Austere

As this was the last of the wines I tasted, perhaps my palate had become well accustomed to the above average acidity and tannin in these wines – I didn’t find it austere at all and actually quite similar to the Montestefano.  In my defence they have the same calcareous limestoil soil type and southerly aspect, and they are both delicious!

Conclusions

These are all fantastic wines, and great value at each price point.  It’s a fascinating way to taste your way round a wine region, so if you have the means and opportunity I highly recommend trying as many of them as you can.

Unlike Aldo Vacca, I can play favourites, but I can’t pick just one – so my three favourite of the range would be the Rio Sordo, Asili and Montestefano.


* The precise number of growers differs throughout the website

** 7WWR eat your heart out!

Single Bottle Review

Terrazes Malbec for World Malbec Day [Frankie’s Single Bottle Review #21]

There seems to be a wine-related celebration of some sort on virtually every day of the year, but World Malbec Day is definitely one of the most keenly observed by wine aficionados.  Started in 2011 by Wines of Argentina to celebrate the country’s signature grape variety, it has grown each year (always on the 17th of April); last year there were 120 events held in 100 cities across 60 countries.

Terrazas de los Andes was founded as recently as 1996, but there is a long history of  Europeans – especially French and Italians – heading to South America and taking their grape-growing and winemaking expertise with them – and of course their home varieties.  Terrazas is a part of well-known drinks group Moët-Hennessy so remains in French hands, and doing well – it was  the winner of the Argentine Wine Producer of the Year 2018 Trophy at the International Wine & Spirit Competition.

Disclosure: sample provided for review, opinions remain my own

Terrazas de los Andes Malbec 2017 (14.0%, RRP €25.70 at independent wine merchants)

Terrazes Malbec 2017 Bottle

There are two important facts about the vines from which this wine was produced:

  1. High Altitude Vineyards – which is important enough to be stated on the front label just below the grape.  There is something of an “arms race” in Argentina to have the highest vineyards.  The Mendoza vineyards are just over a kilometre above sea level!
  2. Old Vines – the age of the plots varies between 20 and 80 years old, giving some concentration to the flavours.

Most Argentinian Malbecs are big, bold, fruity wines that pack an unmistakable punch.  This is no lightweight, but the high altitude has definitely given it some elegance and a (relative) lightness to go with the power.  Plums dominate the palate, with blackberry and vanilla from ageing in French (80%) and American (20%) oak.  There are some fine grained tannins on the finish which give a nice savoury edge.  This would actually be better with the ubiquitous steak than many cheaper commercial style Malbecs, and so it’s definitely worth your consideration – whatever you might be eating on the 17th of Aprl!