Another one to break the mold – Nautilus Estate Marlborough Grüner Veltliner 2011

Nautilus Estate, Marlborough

Nautilus Estate, Marlborough

I’m a fan of Marlborough wines.

I’m a fan of Grüner Veltliner.

Until fairly recently I was very happy with Marlborough Groovies.

But then thanks to some excellent tastings in Dublin I began to realise that, although New Zealand GVs are very nice, they are only analogous to the simpler style of those from Austria.  Outside of those, there’s a whole world of flavours and textures to try – see here.

And now, I’ve changed my mind again!

This is why:

Nautilus Estate Marlborough Grüner Veltliner 2011

Nautilus Estate Marlborough Grüner Veltliner 2011

Nautilus Estate Marlborough Grüner Veltliner 2011

I’m a big fan of Nautilus Wines, especially their lovely fizz and gorgeous Chardonnay (one of the best in New Zealand in my opinion).  It’s great that they’ve planted other aromatic grapes as Marlborough’s dry and cool, long growing season is perfect for them.

Normally this style of Grüner is one that is supposedly best drunk young – which is pretty much true for Marlborough Sauvignons.  Alongside citrus and stone fruit and a dash of white pepper, there’s loads of freshness which makes them a joy to drink.  But once the freshness is gone, you can’t get it back – there’s no Shake n’ Vac solution here.

But this wine was inadvertently left till four years after vintage, and yes a little of the freshness had gone, but it was replaced by some lovely toasty notes – just like you would expect from a good Aussie Semillon.

It’s a delicious wine, I just wish I’d held on to my other bottles for longer!

It just goes to show: most wine is drunk far too young!

Please ponder that message and put a few “ordinary” bottles aside to try in a few years.

Lower Alcohol Wines That Taste Good!

frankstero:

For Throwback Thursday I thought I’d reblog this piece from last year which was quite popular, and it’s the kind of lighter wines that many of us are opening now we’re into Spring

Originally posted on Frankly Wines:

For those brave souls that clicked on this to read more, stick with me – this won’t be full or moralising on the evils of alcohol or telling you to drink less.  I’ll leave that to puritans and the government, respectively.  Neither will I be looking at Weightwatchers or Slimming World branded wines which reportedly taste of goat’s piss.  Having tasted neither the diet wines nor hircine urine this is hearsay, but I will leave that trial to others.

Instead I’d like to cover a few wines that I like which happen to be lower in alcohol than the 14%+ blockbusters which populate wine shelves nowadays.  If you fancy a couple of glasses on a school night that won’t leave you with a heavy head in the morning, this is the way to go.

As a general rule, these wines are grown in relatively cool climates.  The moderate sunshine means that…

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A half-dozen of the best from the Ely BIG Tasting

Twice a year the Ely Winebar and Restaurant Group hold consumer tastings at their larger venue in Dublin’s IFSC.  Over a dozen of their wine suppliers show a selection of their wines, both currently listed and not listed, so that consumers get a chance to try new things and their feedback might lead to new listings!

The tastings are very well organised by Ely Group Wine Manager Ian Brosnan and Head of Biz Dev Jeri Mahon – thanks to both them and all the other staff supporting the event.

Here are a few of the wines which really stood out for me:

1. Charles Heidsieck Brut Reserve NV (Liberty Wine) {by the glass at Ely Place and Ely CHQ}

Champagne Charlie

Charles Heidsieck Brut Reserve

Perhaps it was the occasion, the perfect serving temperature or perhaps just a little extra time in bottle since I tried this last year, but Charles was tasting fantastic. The fruit is lovely and there’s some light biscotti notes from ageing on the lees. Perfectly balanced and poised, this is a definite candidate for the best non-vintage Champagne on the market.

2. San Lorenzo Verdicchio dei Castelli de Jesi Superiore ‘Vigna delle Oche’ Marche 2012 (GrapeCircus at Sheridan’s) {by the glass at Ely Place and Ely CHQ}

San Lorenzo Verdicchio dei Castelli de Jesi Superiore ‘Vigna delle Oche’ 2012

San Lorenzo Verdicchio dei Castelli de Jesi Superiore ‘Vigna delle Oche’ 2012

San Lorenzo is a well-established family producer now run by Natalino Crognaletti – something of a madman/eccentric/genius* (delete as appropriate) who is not only organic, not only biodynamic, but also believes in being self-sufficient. This means that he follows a minimal intervention path of wine making, with much more work required in the vineyard, but even goes so far as to keep chickens so he has his own eggs for fining the wines before bottling!! (This helps remove any big particles and can be an alternative to filtration which can strip out the flavours.

So what’s the result in the glass? Loads and loads of flavour! There’s minerality, citrus and soft stone fruit – and oodles of texture, which would make it a great food wine. You need to give this a try to taste something off the beaten path.

3. Domaine des Baumard Savennières “Clos de St Yves” 2010 (Tyrrell & Co)

Domaine des Baumard Savennières "Clos St Yves"

Domaine des Baumard Savennières “Clos St Yves”

This wine sparked such a positive reaction that I was moved to note the highly articulate comment: “Toast toast toast – frickin awesome!”

Chenin Blanc is one of the world’s most under-rated grapes, and the Loire Valley is perhaps France’s most under-appreciated wine producing areas. Having said that, I don’t often fancy the drier versions, but adore the sweeter ones, all of them having a trademark streak of acidity through the middle.

This example really hit the spot! It has already started to take on more interesting flavours but hasn’t lost its freshness. Tasted blind this would fool plenty into thinking it was a posh white Burgundy.

The producer likes his wines to be as clean as possible so uses no oak barrels and seals bottles with screwcaps rather than corks – thumbs up from me.

4. Paddy Borthwick Wairarapa Sauvignon Blanc 2014 (Wines Direct) {by the glass at Ely CHQ}

Paddy Borthwick Wairarapa Sauvignon Blanc 2014

Paddy Borthwick Wairarapa Sauvignon Blanc 2014

The third word there is the wine region of Wairarapa in the south of New Zealand’s North Island, not to be confused with Waipara which is north of Cantebury on the South Island. It’s an area more well-known for its Pinot Noir, particularly in the main subregion of Martinborough (again, not to be confused with Marlborough), but it is also home to some excellent aromatic whites.

Rather than gooseberry, asparagus and grapefruit which are stereotypical Marlborough Savvy flavours, Sauvignon from here is often even more tropical. This lovely example from Paddy Borthwick had passion fruit notes jumping out of the glass – in fact it reminded me of the passion fruit Mojito that my wife had at Cleaver East on Mother’s Day!

5. Sipp Mack Alsace Grand Cru Rosacker Riesling 2009 (Mitchell & Son) {by the glass at Ely CHQ}

Sipp Mack Alsace Grand Cru Rosacker Riesling 2009

Sipp Mack Alsace Grand Cru Rosacker Riesling 2009

I could happily have spent the evening just smelling this amazing wine (but then I’d have missed out on so much else!) Sipp Mack is one of the top echelon of Alsace producers and a personal favourite of mine, especially their Grand Cru Riesling and Pinot Gris bottles. There’s a touch of sweetness which acts as a counterpoint to the zippy acidity and mineral freshness.

This is drinking gorgeously now but, if you could keep your hands off it, will be even more amazing in five years’ time.

6. D’Arenburg “Lucky Lizard” Chardonnay 2012 (Febvre)

D'Arenberg Adelaide Hills "Lucky Lizard" Chardonnay

D’Arenberg Adelaide Hills “Lucky Lizard” Chardonnay

This is Unreconstructed, All-original, Can’t be bettered, Aussie Chardonnay!

The past decade has seen Australian Chardonnay move back from big, alcoholic fruit bombs to more subtle, mineral and food-friendly styles. Mclaren Vale’s D’Arenburg hasn’t really followed that trend, which wouldn’t be a surprise to anyone who knows of the current boss Chester Osbourne – his shirts are so loud they can be seen from space and he released a wine called Fuckeliana (yes, really!)

In fairness this is actually made the other side of Adelaide from their base, up in the Adelaide Hills which is the source of Shaw + Smith’s M3 Chardonnay. It’s big but doesn’t have that buttery, especially melted butter, taste of some Chardonnays.

Why change when it’s this good?

More to come!

Judge Dread?

dredd

Yesterday I had my first experience judging wines in a competition – hurrah!

But not ordinary wines, no.  These were a small number of wines entered into the (Irish) National Homebrew Club’s third annual competition, so home made wines.  I had expected they would be kit wines, perhaps with an odd tweak here and there, but no…

They were fruit wines!  The so-called “country wine” category…but nothing ventured, nothing gained!  There is vitis vinifera grape wine made in Ireland, though it’s produced in very small quantities and isn’t the finest you might have tried – though it’s definitely drinkable – see here.  The competition had but three entrants in the wines category compared to hundreds of beers of all types.

It was a very interesting experience, and on reflection I’ve jotted down a few thoughts. Please excuse me if they are bleedin’ obvious!

1) Judging isn’t the same as tasting

When you’re tasting, especially if it’s just for your own interest, you can pick and choose which wines you taste and which of those you bother writing tasting notes for.  If you’re judging you have to taste, consider and write up every wine properly.

2) Judging and tasting are easier with reference points

In the big wine competitions wines are usually tasted in flights of a similar type and / or origin, so wines can be compared to their peers.  I’ve never tasted a dandelion wine before…should I expect to taste parsnips?  Particularly with a very small number of entrants to the wines part of this competition, there was no agreed standard of quality to judge against.

3) Amateur-made drinks are not the same as commercial products.

Here I mean amateur in the best sense of the word – they are lovers of what they do, though unpaid.  Do you judge them by what is available on the shelf in your local wine merchants?  Or do you compare them to the less successful producers who don’t even make it that far?

It’s a difficult one to answer.  Guidance was offered by the head judge and organiser, in that scores shouldn’t be too generous – people need to know what to work on.  But then again, we didn’t want to scare off potential entrants.

And…when a wine is obviously faulty, it’s FAULTY!

Here are the results:

Silver Medal Winner

Blackberry

Blackberry

Bronze Medal Winner

Rose Hip

Rose Hip

See the full list of medal winners in each category here!

Old world, New world

Yet another INXS reference, and yet another link to an article on The Taste – but I make no apologies, and expect more in the future!

Please click through to read the full article here.

So, dear reader, do you have a preference for either Old or New world?  Please leave a comment, I would be interested to hear.

Personally, I probably drink wine outside of mealtimes more often than with food, so this perhaps has a bearing on what I like to drink.  But then I really love good Riesling, even when the producer says it’s “difficile à aimer” (difficult to love) on its own as it’s crying out for food.

The reasons why we like the wines we do need a great deal more research – though Tim Hanni MW has made a good start.

 

“Old world new world / I know nothing / But I’ll keep listening” – INXS

This clip is from a 1983 concert performance – when Michael Hutchence still thought he was the second coming of Mick Jagger – but before they became internationally famous.

The track itself is from their third studio album Shabooh Shoobah (1982), which also features “Don’t Change” and “The One Thing”

Colour me White – 10 Reasons Why Colour Varies in White Wines

Have you ever wondered why white wine varies in colour?

Some are almost water white, while others can be lemon though to golden amber.  Surely there must be some logic to this?

Of course there is, but there are lots of inter-related factors which affect the colour of white wines.  Let’s have a look at them one by one.  Hold on to your hats, this might get a bit geeky by the end…

1. Oak

Angel_Oak_Tree_in_SC

Oak Tree (credit: DannyBoy7783)

More specifically maturation in new(er) small(er) oak barrels adds colour.  Certain types of wine are more likely to be barrel aged – Californian Chardonnays, for example – so much so, in fact, that you can see the difference before your nose gets anywhere near the glass.

See this post from 2014 for a more detailed discussion on oak.

2. Sweetness

Botritised Aszú Grape berries for Tokaji

Botritised Aszú Grape berries for Tokaji

The sweeter a wine is, the darker it will generally be. If you take a dessert wine (such as Hungary’s famous Tokaji) which comes in varying levels of sweetness, the depth of colour is a good guide to the level of residual sugar.

In fact, even on the basis of a mobile phone snap on twitter, I’ve had people make a good guess as to the number of Puttonyos* of a Tokaji – totes amazeballs, as the kids say nowadays.

(* putts for short, refers to the number of buckets of sweet grape paste added to a vat of fermenting wine)

3. Age

Age

Age

As a general truism, red wine gets paler with age and white wines get darker.  An illustration: the unique red and white wines of Chateau Musar in Lebanon move closer and closer in appearance as they mature in bottle.  Even Champagne goes golden when mature.

If you’ve got a bottle of Marlborough Sauvignon Blanc that looks quite golden though a clear glass bottle, the chances are that it is past its best…

4. Grape

Gewürztraminer

Gewurztraminer

This factor is the one that most people would guess at. Some white grapes have a slightly darker juice than others which affects what you see in your glass. Good examples of this from my favoured region of Alsace are Gewurztraminer and Pinot Gris.

The Spanish region of Rueda is known for its excellent yet inexpensive whites made from the fairly clear Verdejo grape, but wines of the same vintage do vary in hue. This is down to a certain proportion of Viura in the blend, a permitted grape in Rueda and Rioja plus Catalonia under the name Macabeo. So there you go!

5. Oxygen

Oxygen

Oxygen

Oxygen is both the friend and the enemy of all wine, red, white and all the diverse colours in-between.

a) Oxidised – when exposed to too much oxygen white wines go darker in hue quite quickly. When it happens this can be known as premature oxidation, or premox for short, and has spoiled many a white Burgundy lover’s treasures.

b) Oxidative – this descriptor is used when a wine is deliberately exposed to oxygen, for example with traditional white Rioja.  This style of wine will generally be darker than one in a non-oxidative style.

6. Skin contact

Orange Wine Skin contact

Orange Wine

The biggest fundamental difference between red and white wines is not the colour of the juice when grapes are pressed – with some exceptions, the juice is normally clear. The difference in colour is down to the time that the juice for red wines has in contact with the skins so that colour, flavour and tannin is leached out.

A very short time gives a rosé, an extended period can give an opaque, dense looking wine.

If you use the red wine approach with white grapes you get….orange wine! This is actually a very ancient method of wine making that has become trendy again. It’s arguable that, rather than being a darker type of white wine, orange is actually its own class of wine by itself.

7. Bâtonnage

Bâton

Bâton (the ones for stirring wine look a little different)

This is a fancy French term for stirring with a stick (which sounds somewhat less glamourous).  After fermentation some styles of white wine are left to stand on their lees, i.e. the spent yeast cells which have turned sugar into alcohol. It is particularly useful in Burgundy where it gives a certain creaminess to Chardonnay.

Wines made with lees contact tend to be markedly paler than those fermented in stainless steel and then transferred to cask for barrel maturation because darker pigments are absorbed by the lees.

8. Acidity

Acid

Acid

White wine colour is also affected by the wine’s levels of pH and the amount of acid (usually given as the equivalent in grams of tartaric acid for the chemists out there).  Very simply, more acidity leads to paler white wines.

9. Filtration

charcoal

charcoal

As part of the modern winemaking process, wines are usually filtered before bottling to remove any tiny particles which might give them a cloudy appearance. It depends on the substance used, but some such as charcoal will lighten a wine as tiny coloured particles (as well as some of the flavour) are removed.

10. Sulphur

Sulphur

Sulphur

Sulphur occurs naturally in wine, which is why pretty much every bottle in the shop has the caution “Contains Sulphites”.  Sulphur Dioxide (SO2) is added as a preservative agent at different parts of the wine-making process, and in different amounts.  There is a growing movements among artisan and “Natural” winemakers to reduce or even eliminate these additions.

Particularly in tandem with a low pH (i.e. high acidity), high SO2 concentration has a bleaching effect and removes colour from wine.

Of course, it’s difficult to see the effect in isolation as those producers who don’t add sulphur are often the same ones who allow skin contact…

Conclusion

Of course, these factors don’t act in isolation, and it might be several of them in concert which apply to a particular wine. For example, a traditional white Rioja is likely to be made from Viura, barrel matured and made in an oxidative style. Add a few years in the cellar then you will have quite an amber wine.

It’s not possible to point to any of these factors individually, but we can have a damned good guess!

 

A Taste that’s out of this World

Peregrine Winery Central Otago

Peregrine Winery Central Otago

Some parts of Central Otago look like another world – wild doesn’t even start to cover it. Now vying with Martinborough as the best place for Pinot Noir in New Zealand, there’s an amazing variety of landscapes – some more resembling moonscapes in the former gold-mining areas.

It’s rugged, but beautifully rugged, even on an overcast day.

But it’s not just about Pinot – other varieties do well in the cooler climate down here as well. Chardonnay is an obvious one (Felton Road for example) and so is Riesling.  I think it’s fair to say that New Zealand is still finding its feet with Riesling, but there are some increasingly complex, balanced and just plain delicious wines being made.

Peregrine Central Otago

Peregrine Winery

Peregrine Central Otago Riesling 2010

With excellent acidity, this tastes nigh on dry – the 5 g/l of Residual Sugar adds body and balance without being obviously sweet.  It’s a fabulously versatile wine, great on its own on with anything from seafood to Thai.  At almost five years of age there are secondary aroma and flavours starting to develop along side the lemon and lime of its youth.

Peregrine Riesling Central Otago

Peregrine Riesling

Alcohol is 13.0% which gives you a hint that it’s no featherweight, but has enough body and oomph to really stand up for itself.  This is the type of wine I’d like to buy a case of and drink gradually over the years.

Stockists: not yet available in Ireland, but should have a RRP of €27 – €29

 

Here’s my review of Peregrine’s Pinot Noir on The Taste

thetaste.ie

Taste

 

Valentines Wines (VII) Bloggers Of The World Unite (episode 4)

One of the best parts about becoming a blogger has been meeting other bloggers from near and far – from literally round the corner to the other side of the world.  Reading their blogs has been interesting in itself, but has also been very helpful in learning how to make my own blog better.  Everyone I have met has been polite, pleasant and generous.

For some time now I had been meaning to try collaborating with some of my fellow bloggers – and then I hit on the idea of asking them to contribute a recommendation for a Valentine’s Day wine.  A cheesy romantic link to V-Day was optional – it could just be a wine that the writer really liked and so would recommend – and just a couple of lines was requested, though some wrote more.

I was bowled over by the reaction – everyone I asked agreed to join in!  Some even gave the background as to why a particular wine was romanic for them.

So sincere thanks to all who contributed!

Champagne Marie-Courtin “Résonance” Brut NV by Paddy Murphy (@VineInspiration) of The Vine Inspiration

Champagne Marie-Courtin "Résonance" Brut NV

Champagne Marie-Courtin “Résonance” Brut NV

When I was asked to pick a Valentine’s Day wine, Frankie assured me it didn’t have to be in any way traditional or cheesy.  Still, it’s hard to resist suggesting Champagne for this or indeed any celebratory occasion.

I first tasted Dominique Moreau’s Champagnes a couple of years ago and instantly fell in love (see…I can do cheesy!?).  Dominique’s estate is in the Côte des Bar and named after her grandmother ‘Marie Courtin’.  The vineyards are farmed biodynamically and most of the Champagnes are bottled in an Extra Brut style.

I say most – in reality I thought all her Champagnes were made in this style until I found her Résonance Brut NV (100% Pinot Noir) lurking on the shelves of The Organic Supermarket in Blackrock. If I’m truly honest, it probably does’t thrill me as much as the Extra Brut NV, but even with that caveat it’s worth tracking down this delicious Champagne.

€45.49 from The Organic Supermarket

Valentine’s Wines by Suzi Redmond of Suzi’s Grape Crush

Brunello di Montalcino

Brunello di Montalcino

So chatting with friends I usually get asked for any new recommendations for wine, beer or spirits… with valentines up-coming so did the topic of going for pinks or not…

Pinks are always fun and cute for Valentines but after thinking about it I asked what they wanted from their evening, as in light breezy, more seductive or maybe a slight blend…

For wine, if you want to go bright breezy then a good pink bubbly followed by either a more reasonably priced bottle of bubbles or a lovely rose from the Loire should fit the bill.  If a blend of fun and seduction then bubbles (Celtic Whiskey shop has some half bottles on sale for €9.99) followed by an elegant red.

For me nothing says seduction than a northern Italian red especially a Brunello di Montalcino – pure seduction! It does depend on your menu and budget. If cash is a touch tight go for its second wine Rosso di Montalcino which is quite beautiful.

See Suzi’s full post including beers and spirits recommendations here.

Love Noir California Pinot Noir 2012 by Loie (@cheapwinecurius) of Cheap Wine Curious

Love Noir California Pinot Noir 2012

Love Noir California Pinot Noir 2012Love Noir California Pinot Noir 2012

Perfectly situated in the Valentine’s Day wine section, I found this beauty on the bottom shelf. I’m one to plunder the shelves down under so I bought this wine with cupidity. My expectations for this Pinot were as low as the dust bunnies I am accustomed to shooing away in aisle. However, once home Love Noir had some surprises.

What is that saying? Love thy neighbor? In this case, I bumped into a neighbor fleeing from her inlaws. It was opportune as I was a neighbor in search of a drinking buddy. To tip the scales, the in laws were watching the children. My friend’s walk “to get some fresh air” detoured to my kitchen table and we started to discuss today’s tasting.

Very first thing we noted was the lovely labeling. Gold foil on black matte paper was very classé, and you would never believe it was merely $11 and some change.  But haven’t we all been fooled before.  There was no coincidence that a wine with “LOVE” in the name was launched during the Valentine’s Day holiday season. I also caught a bit of naughtiness in how they positioned this wine. This is what I read on the back:

“Deep & Rich In Style
Silky & Smooth In Taste
LOVE NOIR
Obsession. Desire. Passion.
This is Love Noir.”

Really? I thought I was reading the book jacket of a subgenre of romance novels. My faith with this vintage was waning. But I poured anyways.

Color was a dark, red purple. The nose was pomegranate, plum, cedar. There was good structure and I could identify 3 distinct layers; fruit first, balanced acids and smooth tannins second and thirdly a lingering woodsy, berry, oak finish.  Whether aged in barrel or not, there was distinctly oak in the finish and it was pleasant and complimented the bold fruit nicely.

Hey, “every wine has a darker side.” I think I’ve surrendered to the “LOVE NOIR.” The “richness” of this wine was able to “spark intensity and intrigue.”  If I can, I am certain you will “succumb to your urges and experience LOVE NOIR. Love. Changes. Everything.”

I’m not slavish to reading labels, but if you buy this wine, it is the gift with purchase. I rate this wine as a buy again – was quite good for the price and a pleasure to both drink and read aloud even in mixed company!

$11.49 Available at Target (USA)

Stay curious!
Loie

The full list of 2015 Valentines Wines posts:

My 15 minutes of fame?

“In the future, everyone will be world-famous for 15 minutes” Andrej Varhola, Jr

This week I had the extremely unexpected (but nice!) surprise to find myself listed as one of Wine Owners’ top 10 most influential UK wine writers and bloggers:

Top 10 UK influencers

Top 10 UK influencers

Among such esteemed company I felt like something of a charlatan, but given that it’s principally based on social media, and I tweet a LOT, there might be a grain of truth in it. Of course the other writers in the top 10 have newspaper columns and have published books, so it’s not as though social media is their main outlet (and if any paper needs a new writer, drop me a line ;) )

Continue reading

Valentines Wines (V) – Romantic, Tacky or Kitsch?

I’m often suspicious of marketing in the wine world, perhaps because my original profession is far from the creative side of things.  In particular, I have wondered if marketing budgets trump wine quality itself – there are a few big brands whose wines I think are just swill – you know the ones I mean.

But are marketing and quality wine mutually exclusive?  Here’s a wine that puts that to the test.  Disclosure: the bottle was kindly supplied by O’Briens

Lanson Rosé NV “Valentine’s” (€54.99, currently €44.99, O’Briens)

Lanson Rosé NV

Lanson Rosé NV – back

This is Lanson’s non-vintage rosé Champagne in special packaging.  I have some colour-blindness, but even I can tell it’s VERY PINK.  It comes with a pen so that you can use it as a Valentine’s message to your spouse / partner / crush.

Lanson Rosé NV - front

Lanson Rosé NV – front

Most readers will be more interested in the contents than the packaging – this is a wine blog after all.  So how is the liquid inside?

Lanson is not yet that well-known on the Irish market but is among the top few in the UK. They block malolactic fermentation in the base wines, so the end product remains very fresh tasting – and it works!  The acidity isn’t fierce, but this remains far more refreshing than some rosés (in particular) which can be insipid.

The assemblage is 32% Chardonnay, 53% Pinot Noir and 15% Pinot Meunier, which shows on the nose as red fruit, and then to taste there’s lots of fresh strawberry and raspberry with a citrus lift.

I’m not a rosé drinker in general, but quality rosé Champagne is really growing on me.

And the packaging – is it Romantic, Tacky or Kitsch?

In my opinion it’s all three, but then so is Valentine’s day!

The full list of 2015 Valentines Wines posts: